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Always have an emergency grab bag to hand when at sea

Always have an emergency grab bag to hand when at sea

 

Grab bag:

In the event of having to abandon ship, it is recommended to have a designated waterproof bag to carry essential emergency items. 

These might include items already in use on the boat, as well as some already stored in the bag.

Emergency at sea – bag contents:

• Handheld GPS 
• Handheld VHF 
• PLB/EPIRB 
• Flares 
• Sea sickness pills 
• Torch and batteries 
• First aid kit 
• Thermal protective aids 
• Medication 
• Food and water 
• Ship’s documents 
• Personal documents 

(see Safe Skipper for more – the app for all boating enthusiasts)

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