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How to Learn The ColRegs and Avoid Collisions at Sea

How to Avoid Collisions At Sea With The ColRegs

 
 
 
Every Skipper Needs Accurate Knowledge of the IRPCS ColRegs

As a responsible skipper it is every skipper’s duty to learn and apply the IRPCS ColRegs.

 

How To Avoid Collisions at sea

Accurate knowledge and interpretation of the IRPCS ColRegs ensures that every skipper can avoid collisions by applying their responsibility, correct look-out, safe speed, action to avoid collisions, in traffic separation schemes, whilst overtaking, in head-on situations, crossing situations, action by give-way vessels, action by stand-on vessels and the proper conduct when vessels are in restricted visibility.

What We Learned Reading ColRegs Puzzles

Reading through the many ColRegs puzzles posted online in sailing and boating forums it has become clear to us just how often the COLREGS are breached when collisions occur, and how widespread poor understanding and interpretation of the ColRegs is amongst skippers.

The forums and the questions asked are a great starting point for wide-ranging discussion and analysis on all aspects of collision avoidance, and we’ve concluded that what often separates a good skipper from a poor one is not just their skill and ability to overcome risk, but exercising the judgment to AVOID risk altogether. This comes with experience as well as training, you simply never stop learning the ColRegs.

How to Learn The ColRegs

There are lots of different ways to learn the ColRegs, and we chose to help skippers with that process by developing a series of easy-t-use graphically-led mobile apps to help skippers everywhere learn and apply the ColRegs and IALA systems

We want all our users to enjoy a safe, collision-free passage at sea!

Happy sailing!

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ColRegs – avoiding collisions at sea

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How to Avoid Collisions At Sea With The ColRegs

      Every Skipper Needs Accurate Knowledge of the IRPCS ColRegs As a responsible skipper it is every skipper’s duty to learn and apply the IRPCS...

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While wooden boat hull maintenance is mostly straightforward, it is always a good idea to take expert advice on any repair job needed doing to a wooden boat, unless you have done the job before and know what you are doing.

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Boating Rules of the Road – International ColRegs

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Essential Knots: Clove hitch

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