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Boating emergency - how to broadcast a MAYDAY emergency call

How to broadcast a MAYDAY emergency call

 

How to broadcast a MAYDAY emergency call if a vessel or person is in grave and imminent danger and immediate assistance is required:

• Check that your VHF radio is on and high power setting is selected 
Select Channel 16 (or 2182kHz for MF) 

• Press the transmit button and say slowly and clearly: 
“MAYDAY, MAYDAY, MAYDAY”

“THIS IS… ” 
(say the name of your vessel 3 times. Say your MMSI number and call sign) 

“MAYDAY, THIS IS…” 
(say name of vessel) 

“MY POSITION IS…” 
(latitude and longitude, true bearing and distance from a known point, or general direction) 

“I AM…” 
(say nature of distress eg SINKING, ON FIRE) 

“I REQUIRE IMMEDIATE ASSISTANCE”

“I HAVE…” 
(say number of persons on board PLUS any other useful information – such as sinking, flares fired, abandoning to liferaft) 

“OVER”

• Now release transmit button and listen for reply 

• Keep listening to Channel 16 for instructions 

• If you hear nothing then repeat the distress call 

Vessels with GMDSS equipment should make aMAYDAY call by voice on Ch 16 or MF 2182 kHz after sending a DSC Distress alert on VHF Ch 70 or MF 2187.5 kHz 

DSC Radio Emergency Procedure

• In an emergency, press the DSC radio’s red button for 15 seconds and then transmit a voice message on Channel 16. 

• Prepare for sending/receiving subsequent distress traffic on the distress traffic frequency (2182 kHz on MF, Ch16 on VHF) 

• NOTE: The nature of distress can be selected from the DSC radio receiver’s menu.

Information from our Safe Skipper App

“A well written and detailed app for yachts & inland craft also quite useful for ocean going vessels – well done.”

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