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ColRegs: Traffic Separation Schemes

ColRegs: Traffic Separation Schemes

Learn ColRegs

Rule 10: Traffic Separation Schemes.

(c) A vessel shall, so far as practicable, avoid crossing traffic lanes but if obliged to do so shall cross on a heading as nearly as practicable at right angles to the general direction of traffic flow. (d) (i) A vessel shall not use an inshore traffic zone when she can safely use the appropriate traffic lane within the adjacent traffic separation scheme. However, vessels of less than 20 metres in length, sailing vessels and vessels engaged in fishing may use the inshore traffic zone.

(From Nautical Rules of the Road – ColRegs for power boating and sailing – a Safe-Skipper App)

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