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Essential Knots: Round turn and two half hitches

Use: Tying a rope to a pole or a ring.

Step 1. Pass the end around the object.

Step 2. Make a second turn.

Step 3. Take the working end over the standing part, tuck it between the two parts to make the first hitch.

Step 4. Repeat the previous step to make a second hitch. Pull tight.

Tip: Practice tying a rope to a mooring ring or a post using a round turn and two half hitches.  

A one stop guide to tying and understanding all of the 50 most useful nautical knots!

   

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