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First Aid Afloat at Sea - fish spine injury. Get Safe Skipper boat insurance.

First Aid Afloat

First Aid Afloat – Here is what to do if somebody stands on a fish spine:

• Check for dangers. Is it safe for you to enter the water?

• Check for levels of response and for normal breathing

• Inform emergency services if necessary

• If needed treat serious bleeding

• If easily done remove embedded fish spines

Immerse wound in as hot water as possible without scalding. Leave in the water for up to 90 minutes for pain relief and to help remove small spines

• Apply a cold compress to wound if hot water is not relieving the pain

• Clean wound with antiseptics wipes from the first aid kit

• Seek medical assistance if necessary

(taken from Paul Hopkins new app for iPhone & Tablets, First Aid Afloat)

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