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Jellyfish sting First Aid Afloat at Sea

First Aid Afloat – jellyfish stings

 

Wherever you are boating in the world I am sure you will be using a pilot guide to aid your navigation.

Often in the introduction to the area section there will be a part talking about different types of sea creatures that may sting you and how to treat a sting.

Sometimes it can be useful to do some additional research online as well. One type of sea creature that I have come across all round the world are jellyfish. I am sure you are aware they can give a painful sting.

How to treat a jellyfish sting:

• Check for dangers

• Check for level of response and for normal breathing, treat as appropriate

• If crew member shows signs of severe allergic reactions, treat as appropriate

• To treat the actual sting, wash the area with vinegar (4-6% acetic acid solution) for at least 30 minutes to deactivate the venom

• After the sting material is removed or deactivated immerse the area in as hot water as possible without scalding

• Monitor and record the crew member’s vital signs

(from the new iPhone & Android app by Paul Hopkins First Aid Afloat)

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