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Hourly checks for sailors and motorboaters

Hourly Checks when sailing or motoring

 

Hourly Checks

Get into the habit of carrying out these checks and both yourself, your crew and your boat will be safer:

Fill in log book

Filling in the log book can seem an unnecessary chore but having a record of courses and positions is valuable if you have an electrical or electronic failure. You can also see weather trends.

 

Engine compartment

A regular check in the engine compartment can detect any leaks or problems before they get serious.

 

Weather forecast

Update the weather forecast at regular intervals if you can.

 

Course and position

Check both the course you are steering and the course being followed on the plotter and adjust if necessary.

 

Double checking

Try to check your position by visual means or with the echo sounder if you are within sight of land to confirm that the GPS is working satisfactorily.

 

Fuel

If you are running under power check the fuel being used and the fuel remaining to ensure that you are not consuming more than expected.

 

Crew OK?

Check that the crew are all OK and in good shape. Look for any signs of seasickness.

 

From the new app for iPhone & Android:

Dag Pike’s Boating Checklists

ag Pike began his career as a merchant captain, went on to test lifeboats, and took up fast boat navigation, winning a string of trophies for powerboat races around the world, including navigating Richard Branson's Virgin Atlantic Challenger on the record-breaking fastest Atlantic crossing by powerboat.

About the author:

Dag Pike began his career as a merchant captain, went on to test lifeboats, and took up fast boat navigation, winning a string of trophies for powerboat races around the world, including navigating Richard Branson’s Virgin Atlantic Challenger on the record-breaking fastest Atlantic crossing by powerboat.

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