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Common causes of fire on boats

How to prevent a fire onboard your boat

 

Fire prevention on boats – common causes of fire:

• Smoking below decks

• Galley cookers

• Build-up of butane or propane gas in the bilges

• Faulty wiring

• Petrol/gasoline vapour in engine bay

• Flammable paints and solvents

Fire onboard a boat – fire prevention tips:

• No Smoking below decks

• Butane and propane gases are heavier than air and leaks will result in a build up of gas in the bilges. To clear gas, open hatches, head downwind to allow fresh air into cabin areas and pump the bilges

• Keep gas valves turned off at the bottle and cooker when not in use

• Fit gas and smoke detectors

• Regularly check butane and propane gas fittings and tubing for leaks

• Keep butane and propane gas bottles in cockpit lockers which drain overboard

• Stow all flammable liquids in well secured, upright containers in lockers that vent outboard

• Never leave naked cooker flames and frying pans unattended

• Always vent engine bays before starting inboard engines

• Have the wiring checked regularly

All crew should know the location of fire extinguishers and fire blankets on board and know how to operate them.

(info. from Safe Skipper app for iPhone, iPad & Android)

Diesel engine winterisation

An inactive boat engine needs to be protected from corrosion during the winter, caused by the rising humidity levels through the cold months and the salty coastal air. This applies whether the boat is left afloat or hauled out over the winter. Read here about the two important stages of winterisaton for a diesel boat engine.

Steel hull maintenance

A steel boat owner’s biggest enemy is corrosion. You don’t have to worry about osmosis or rotting timbers, instead rust is the number one issue that will keep you awake at night.

How to operate a winch

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How to improve a yacht’s upwind performance

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The VHF DSC Radio jargon buster

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Essential boat engine checklist

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Marine diesel exhaust checks

You should inspect the exhaust system for corrosion damage regularly, especially around the injection bend. If you have noticed the engine exhaust smoking a lot during the sailing season this can also indicate a number of potential problems.

Top five windvane self steering installation questions

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Boat electrics

All boat owners should have a basic knowledge of electrics, both to avoid encountering electrical problems at sea and to stand a chance of solving them should they occur.

Boat engine cooling systems

Some boat engine breakdowns are unavoidable but those caused by lack of maintenance or regular checks can be avoided. Failure to maintain an engine’s cooling system is a well known example of this, so it is well worth spending time checking over the cooling system both when the boat is ashore and afloat.

Leaking decks

Leaking decks are perceived as a nuisance by some boat owners, but if leaks are ignored a much more serious situation may well be developing, especially in the case of boats with balsa or plywood deck cores. So deck leaks do need to be investigated and dealt with.

Boat Handling – anchoring

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Common marine electrical problems

Most problems with marine electrical systems arise from four possible sources, a lack of maintenance, a poor standard of initial installation, insufficient battery capacity, or ineffective charging systems.
Water ingress is a frequent issue – salt water can corrode contacts very quickly. If connections are not scrupulously clean – or are loose – resistance will be increased, resulting in progressively reduced power.

How to ensure your boat is in proper working condition

In this article Eva Tucker from Volvo Penta presents a handy check list of all the things that you need to check regularly in order to make sure that your boat is in a seaworthy condition. Including maintenance, safety gear and electrical checks.

Rudders and steering systems – Part 2

One thing all rudders have in common is that they have three main parts that need to be checked: the rudder, or a steerable drive leg in the case of many power boats; the system that joins the rudder to the steering; the steering control itself.

Understanding marine sealants & adhesives

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Points of Sailing

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Jester Challenge 2022 – Sailing single handed from Plymouth UK to the Azores: Part 5 – Boat Management

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How a propeller works

Have a look around any boatyard and you will notice quite a variety of propellers – some have two blades, some have three and others have four or more. While most propellers are completely rigid some have blades that fold.

Sailing & Motoring in Fog

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Nautical paper charts – a reminder of the basics

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Safety at sea principles

Safety at sea is not as simple as just spending money adding shiny new emergency equipment such as liferafts, danbuoys, distress flares, EPIRBs and so on.

First aid at sea basics

At least one person on board should be trained in first aid and know how to administer the contents of the first aid kit, ensuring there are adequate supplies for the planned duration of the trip.

Boat engine basics

Boat engines come in all shapes and sizes and include inboards, outboards, petrol, diesel, electric and hybrid systems. Some engines are...

Jester Challenge 2022 – Sailing single handed from Plymouth UK to the Azores: Getting to the Start

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