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Common causes of fire on boats

How to prevent a fire onboard your boat

 

Fire prevention on boats – common causes of fire:

• Smoking below decks

• Galley cookers

• Build-up of butane or propane gas in the bilges

• Faulty wiring

• Petrol/gasoline vapour in engine bay

• Flammable paints and solvents

Fire onboard a boat – fire prevention tips:

• No Smoking below decks

• Butane and propane gases are heavier than air and leaks will result in a build up of gas in the bilges. To clear gas, open hatches, head downwind to allow fresh air into cabin areas and pump the bilges

• Keep gas valves turned off at the bottle and cooker when not in use

• Fit gas and smoke detectors

• Regularly check butane and propane gas fittings and tubing for leaks

• Keep butane and propane gas bottles in cockpit lockers which drain overboard

• Stow all flammable liquids in well secured, upright containers in lockers that vent outboard

• Never leave naked cooker flames and frying pans unattended

• Always vent engine bays before starting inboard engines

• Have the wiring checked regularly

All crew should know the location of fire extinguishers and fire blankets on board and know how to operate them.

(info. from Safe Skipper app for iPhone, iPad & Android)

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