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Safety Equipment Checklist for Boats

Safety Equipment Checklist for Boats

Safety Equipment Checklist for Boats

 

Liferaft line attached

The liferaft will not work unless the trigger line is attached to a strong point so check this out.

 

Lifejackets in good condition and stowed

Lifejackets are often stowed in a locker and neglected – check them out and routinely check the weight of the gas bottle if they have air inflation.

 

Portable VHF available and charged

The portable VHF is a vital piece of safety equipment both in case the electrics fail and to take with you if you have to abandon ship. It is not much use unless it is charged up.

 

Flares in date and available

Flares should be checked out annually for expiry dates and condition.

 

Bilge pumps working

The only real test is to put some water in the bilge and pump it out. Check the suction side to ensure that it is not blocked.

 

Fire extinguishers checked and serviced

Fire extinguishers will have the date of the last service on them so check when the next one is due. Also check for corrosion as some extinguishers are not designed for the marine environment.

 

Lifebuoy/MOB in stowage and ready for use

Simple to check but because it is stowed in an exposed position check the condition of ropes and attachments as well.

 

Safety harnesses

Check that these are in sound condition and also check out the attachment wires that they clip on to.

 

Snippet from the new app for iPhone & Android:

Dag Pike’s Boating Checklists

ag Pike began his career as a merchant captain, went on to test lifeboats, and took up fast boat navigation, winning a string of trophies for powerboat races around the world, including navigating Richard Branson's Virgin Atlantic Challenger on the record-breaking fastest Atlantic crossing by powerboat.

About the author:

Dag Pike began his career as a merchant captain, went on to test lifeboats, and took up fast boat navigation, winning a string of trophies for powerboat races around the world, including navigating Richard Branson’s Virgin Atlantic Challenger on the record-breaking fastest Atlantic crossing by powerboat.

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