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In this article, inflatable paddle board expert Jason Paul gives the top 5 reasons why an inflatable SUP should be your next yacht accessory purchase.

 

While a crisp new Bimini top or the latest GoPro camera may be a few of the more popular yacht accessories, there’s one noteworthy item that often gets overlooked — an inflatable stand up paddle board or iSUP.

 

Reason #1: iSUPs are Perfect for Off-Boat Exploration

While it’s true that your boat can take you just about anywhere across the Seven Seas, sometimes you just want to explore those nooks and crannies that bigger vessels can’t reach. Whether it’s gliding through shallow waters or in between mangrove canals, an inflatable stand up paddle board will open up a whole new world of mobility and freedom.

Additionally, it’ll offer you a more hands-on sense of adventure while burning a few extra calories  — neither of which can hurt.

The thrill of venturing across the ocean with nothing but the power of your arms is reason enough to consider owning a SUP. Others, however, appreciate the Zen-like “flow state” induced by gently paddling over water.

In either case, inflatable SUPs can add an extra layer of fun and excitement to your boating life.

Reason #2: They’re a Great Alternative to Dinghies

For all their uses, dinghies are often bulky, difficult to store, and heavy. An inflatable SUP can offer you many of the same functions in a much more convenient package.

If you’re anchored out at sea with some fellow boat owners, let your SUP be the perfect water taxi to transfer people, pets, and items. No matter what the occasion is, you’ll enjoy the convenience of not being bogged down by an excessively-large tender.

Even in the event of an emergency situation, a paddle board can help you travel long distances safely and efficiently — just be sure to choose a board that is well-constructed and extremely stable in the water (the new BLACKFIN Model X board is one such option).

Reason #3: Inflatable Paddle Boards are Compact and Portable

Nothing is easier to store and transport than an inflatable paddle board. Once deflated, an iSUP can simply be rolled up and conveniently stored in a large backpack — they offer the versatility and functionality of a rigid board without taking up precious storage space on your yacht.

Reason #4: An Inflatable SUP won’t Damage Your Yacht

Few things are more frustrating than a dent or scratch on your boat’s precious surface.

Just about every object you bring onboard poses a risk — just waiting for that sharp turn or choppy wave to send it flying into the floor or side panel.

Fortunately, this is a problem that you’ll never have to worry about with an inflatable SUP. With their tough yet forgiving PVC exterior, inflatable paddle boards are a much safer alternative to rigid boards — which have been known to cause some serious damage.

Reason #5: Inflatable SUPs are fun for The Whole Family… and Friends!

What’s a day out on the water without good music, food, and your closest family and friends? Inflatable paddle boards are a great way to take your fun on the water to the next level.

Whether you’re racing each other, cruising around, or exploring nearby areas, inflatable SUPs are a versatile platform that all ages enjoy.

Final Thoughts

Inflatable SUP boards have exploded in popularity over the past few years because of their extreme portability, ease of use, and overall fun factor. Tossing one on your boat before heading out onto the water can definitely add a whole new layer of excitement to the day — but in closing, we want to remind you to keep things safe by following these simple safety guidelines:

  • Always Wear a Leash: This prevents you and your board from ever becoming separated.
  • Wear a Personal Flotation Device (PFD): Life jackets and inflatable belt packs save lives — wear one.
  • Be Aware of Conditions & Weather Forecasts: Be cautious of your environment, and watch out for potential storms and rip currents.
  • Paddle With a Partner: The buddy system is always the safest system.
  • Familiarize Yourself with Basic First Aid Practices: With a basic understanding of first aid practices, you will be better prepared to deal with common medical emergencies.

Our thanks to Jason Paul for contributing this article. Jason is editor of InflatableBoarder.com

 

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