Select Page

In this article, inflatable paddle board expert Jason Paul gives the top 5 reasons why an inflatable SUP should be your next yacht accessory purchase.

 

While a crisp new Bimini top or the latest GoPro camera may be a few of the more popular yacht accessories, there’s one noteworthy item that often gets overlooked — an inflatable stand up paddle board or iSUP.

 

Reason #1: iSUPs are Perfect for Off-Boat Exploration

While it’s true that your boat can take you just about anywhere across the Seven Seas, sometimes you just want to explore those nooks and crannies that bigger vessels can’t reach. Whether it’s gliding through shallow waters or in between mangrove canals, an inflatable stand up paddle board will open up a whole new world of mobility and freedom.

Additionally, it’ll offer you a more hands-on sense of adventure while burning a few extra calories  — neither of which can hurt.

The thrill of venturing across the ocean with nothing but the power of your arms is reason enough to consider owning a SUP. Others, however, appreciate the Zen-like “flow state” induced by gently paddling over water.

In either case, inflatable SUPs can add an extra layer of fun and excitement to your boating life.

Reason #2: They’re a Great Alternative to Dinghies

For all their uses, dinghies are often bulky, difficult to store, and heavy. An inflatable SUP can offer you many of the same functions in a much more convenient package.

If you’re anchored out at sea with some fellow boat owners, let your SUP be the perfect water taxi to transfer people, pets, and items. No matter what the occasion is, you’ll enjoy the convenience of not being bogged down by an excessively-large tender.

Even in the event of an emergency situation, a paddle board can help you travel long distances safely and efficiently — just be sure to choose a board that is well-constructed and extremely stable in the water (the new BLACKFIN Model X board is one such option).

Reason #3: Inflatable Paddle Boards are Compact and Portable

Nothing is easier to store and transport than an inflatable paddle board. Once deflated, an iSUP can simply be rolled up and conveniently stored in a large backpack — they offer the versatility and functionality of a rigid board without taking up precious storage space on your yacht.

Reason #4: An Inflatable SUP won’t Damage Your Yacht

Few things are more frustrating than a dent or scratch on your boat’s precious surface.

Just about every object you bring onboard poses a risk — just waiting for that sharp turn or choppy wave to send it flying into the floor or side panel.

Fortunately, this is a problem that you’ll never have to worry about with an inflatable SUP. With their tough yet forgiving PVC exterior, inflatable paddle boards are a much safer alternative to rigid boards — which have been known to cause some serious damage.

Reason #5: Inflatable SUPs are fun for The Whole Family… and Friends!

What’s a day out on the water without good music, food, and your closest family and friends? Inflatable paddle boards are a great way to take your fun on the water to the next level.

Whether you’re racing each other, cruising around, or exploring nearby areas, inflatable SUPs are a versatile platform that all ages enjoy.

Final Thoughts

Inflatable SUP boards have exploded in popularity over the past few years because of their extreme portability, ease of use, and overall fun factor. Tossing one on your boat before heading out onto the water can definitely add a whole new layer of excitement to the day — but in closing, we want to remind you to keep things safe by following these simple safety guidelines:

  • Always Wear a Leash: This prevents you and your board from ever becoming separated.
  • Wear a Personal Flotation Device (PFD): Life jackets and inflatable belt packs save lives — wear one.
  • Be Aware of Conditions & Weather Forecasts: Be cautious of your environment, and watch out for potential storms and rip currents.
  • Paddle With a Partner: The buddy system is always the safest system.
  • Familiarize Yourself with Basic First Aid Practices: With a basic understanding of first aid practices, you will be better prepared to deal with common medical emergencies.

Our thanks to Jason Paul for contributing this article. Jason is editor of InflatableBoarder.com

 

Boat surveys

A full boat survey assesses the condition of the hull, mechanical gear and means of propulsion. The survey is carried out with the boat...

Top 5 Reasons Why an Inflatable SUP Should Be Your Next Yacht Accessory

In this article, inflatable paddle board expert Jason Paul gives the top 5 reasons why an inflatable SUP should be your next...

Feeling anxious at sea

  Some people feel anxious at sea. Will they be seasick? What if they get caught in a violent storm? Could the boat...

Antifouling for leisure boats – Part 4

Applying antifouling. Antifouling is best applied on a dry, calm day. It is best to apply the antifouling in the middle of the day to ensure the hull is dry and as warm as possible.

Antifouling for leisure boats – Part 3

Antifouling is one of the least pleasant boat maintenance jobs to do, but it has to be done. The very worst job of all is removing the old antifouling as this can get seriously messy and is very hard work.

Boat Engine Safety Checks

  Boat Engine Safety Checks Every skipper needs to make regular essential boat engine safety checks. Below you will...

VHF DSC radio – how best to communicate at sea

There are many ways to communicate with others at sea. What makes the VHF DSC radio the best form of short range...

Rewiring a boat – overcoming the challenges involved

Skippers need to have a basic knowledge of boat electrics, to avoid potential problems and to be able to solve them when...

Essential Knots: Figure of eight

Essential Knots: Figure of eight Use: Stopper knot, prevents a rope from being pulled through a hole e.g. through a block or...

Safety Briefings – leave nothing to chance

Before giving your crew a safety briefing, it is worth considering the specific circumstances of the planned trip, the...

Wooden Hull Repairs

While wooden boat hull maintenance is mostly straightforward, it is always a good idea to take expert advice on any repair job needed doing to a wooden boat, unless you have done the job before and know what you are doing.

Wooden Hulls – Part 1

Traditional wooden boats have a plank on frame construction, a centuries old boat building method that is still in use today. Variations of the traditional method include carvel, clinker and strip planking, which all relate to the way the planking is attached to the frame.

Wooden Hulls – Part 2

It is important to ensure the essential hull maintenance of a wooden boat is done, even if you are paying others to look after your boat for you. The priority is to prevent rot from taking hold. The protective layers of paint and varnish over wood are far more critical than on GRP boats, where the topsides are painted more for cosmetic reasons.

Cleaning & polishing painted topsides

The gelcoat topsides of a GRP boat can be pampered and restored to their former glory relatively easily when it is ashore. Gelcoat is only a very thin outer layer of the hull, often less than 1mm thick, so you should avoid cleaning it with highly abrasive cleaners, or an-ything that could potentially damage its surface.

Hull inspection – the annual checks

With the boat ashore for the winter it is time to do a hull inspection - the annual checks. Are there any scratches and chips in the...

Understanding tides

If you are used to sailing in tidal waters, you will know that tides can be both a benefit and a hindrance to the sailor. In many ways,...

Boatyard Health and Safety

Boat storage facilities are potentially hazardous environments and it is the responsibility of both boat owners and boatyards to ensure that the...

Know your Navlights & Shapes – essential for all skippers

Know your Navlights & Shapes International Regulations for Preventing Collisions at Sea (ColRegs) Anyone who is...

Boating Rules of the Road – International ColRegs

    International ColRegs Rule 7: Risk of Collision Anyone who is responsible for a vessel at sea, from the...

Sail boat rig checks – Part 2

In part two of Sail boat rig checks we run through some useful rig maintenance tips and then finish with a brief look at what a professional rig check involves.

Navigation safety: a quick-reference mobile app to learn the ColRegs NavLights and Shapes

 Safety at SeaSafety at sea will always remains a topical and important subject that will no doubt dominate the syllabuses of nautical...

Points of Sailing

The course on which a boat is sailing can be described by its angle to the wind, not to be confused with its compass...

Understanding your boat’s compass

Article submitted by Mike Rossiter, Certificated Compass Adjuster. Since the magnetic compass was first used by the Chinese...

Seized fixings and fastenings

Maintaining a boat can be a rewarding experience but at times it can also be frustrating. A prime example of this is when you come across a seized fixing or fastening that refuses to budge. Read our tips on how to release and fix them:

Steel hull maintenance

A steel boat owner’s biggest enemy is corrosion. You don’t have to worry about osmosis or rotting timbers, instead rust is the number one issue that will keep you awake at night.